Music inspired by Buddhist thought

Amoghasiddhi

Part of a group of compositions for each of the five Meditation Buddhas. Amoghasiddhi has bar lengths of five beats (section one) and nine beats (sections two and three), wherein the use of nine beats corresponds to the symbol of Amoghasiddhi (Buddha of All-accomplishing Wisdom) sitting on a throne with nine lotus petals, whilst five relates to the number of syllables in his name. 
Music for solo horn and 8 accompanying horns written in 1999 to celebrate the great Buddha of All-accomplishing Wisdom. 
Just intonation including some 19th harmonics.

 

Dakini 

Mantra as music, Dakini story in music, 7 movements for cello & horn in extended just intonation.

Part of a set of two compositions (with Heruka) for horn and cello (Matthew Farrell). Dakini and Heruka work together in a mandala along with Amoghasiddhi (& Green Tara), Amitabha (& Pandaravasini), Ratnasambhava (& Mamaki), Akshobhya (& Locana), Vairochana (& Akashadateshvari). I got this info from Lama Govinda's great book The Foundations of Tibetan Buddhism.

 

Heruka 

Honouring the wrathful (energizing and energy clearing) Buddhist 'deity', this 7 movement work, when performed live, has the horn player moving to five locations in the performance space to outline a mandala. The cellist remains seated throughout. 
Extended just intonation, with the 1st movement featuring harmonics 1-31 of the low horn in C.

Part of a set of two compositions (with Dakini) for horn and cello (Matthew Farrell). Dakini and Heruka work together in a mandala along with Amoghasiddhi (& Green Tara), Amitabha (& Pandaravasini), Ratnasambhava (& Mamaki), Akshobhya (& Locana), Vairochana (& Akashadateshvari). I got this info from Lama Govinda's great book The Foundations of Tibetan Buddhism. 

Locana

Locana is the feminine aspect of Mirror-like Wisdom. The music Locana plays out as a sacred ‘song’ (no words) in four verses beginning with the violoncello. The horn has verse 2, violin the next then all present their verse simultaneously bringing out a mood of inner rapture. In concert, flute, violin and horn find a different spot in the performance space for the rhythmically free opening, though this is not heard in this video. The unusual placement of the players gives a sense of an aural mandala.